[Historical Review] The Limits of Papal Authority and the Fate of a Heretical pope: An exclusive interview with +Bishop Athanasius Schneider (2nd Look)

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Pope Vigilius

In an exclusive interview with Lifesitenews , Bishop +Athanasius Schneider elaborated on his essay which is one of the most exhaustive pieces written to the question of a heretical Pope in our modern day. I will be honing in one particular comment made in this interview, which was teased out more fully in the essay, and then comment on it with the historical record in view. Continue reading

[Review] +Athanasius Schneider: On the question of a heretical pope

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Source: OnePeterFive

Rorate Caeli published a guest article from  Bishop +Athanasius Schneider on the question of what to do in the case of an explicit heretical Pope. Herein is my review of it.

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St. Theodore the Studite (759-826) : Eastern Orthodox Saint and Papal Infallibility

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St Theodore the Studite

Are the frequent appeals to Rome from St. Theodore the Studite regarding the Iconoclastic controversy merely indicative of a pragmatic and opportunistic motive? Is it the case that Theodore really had no sense of attributing Papal supremacy, nor infallibility, and was just speaking with flowery language, excessive rhetoric, and literary devices in order to give an allegorical or symbolic sense of primacy? Continue reading

Inquiry into Eastern Orthodoxy: A Catholic Guideline

A friend of mine sent me a series of questions on the subject of the Papacy with Eastern Orthodoxy in mind. Since these questions are pretty standard, I thought I would make a blog post with the best standard answers I could give. Enjoy. Continue reading

Where Peter Is…..Not

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WherePeterIs has published another article which attempts to argue that all Papal teaching, even non-definitive Papal teaching (i.e. any exercise of the Magisterium of the Pope) is 100% infallibly protected from all error. You can read it here.

In fact, we have at least one historical scenario, completely ratified by Pope St. Leo II, where the opposite is proven. At the 6th Ecumenical Council held in Constantinople (681), the deposed Monothelite Macarius of Antioch had dug up the 2 letters of Honorius, Pope of Rome, which were written to the Patriarch of Constantinople, Sergius. The Council read aloud these 2 letters (they were obviously not ex-cathedra), and proceeded to anathematize Honorius as a heretic alongside Sergius, Cyrus, Pyrrhus, Pharan, Theodore, et al. Continue reading

On This [Heretical] Rock, I Will Build My Church?

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“Denial of Peter” – by Carl Heinrich Bloch

Without a doubt, the current state of affairs in Catholicism, and the Papacy in particular, has struck one of the greatest challenges for her apologists. Many people are driven to  think there is a massive problem with the coherence of Catholic ecclesiology with regard to the Papacy. The problem can be illustrated by citing one of the Catholic Church’s most astute contemporary theologians today. Continue reading

St. Maximos the Confessor (580-662) – Papal Supremacy and Infallibility by Divine Right

I have edited this article extensively to interact with Orthodox Byzantine historian A. Ed Siecienski.

Erick Ybarra

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As many readers know, the Monothelite controversy occupied the Church’s attention in the 7th century, and it was concluded by a firm condemnation of the belief that in Christ there is only one single will or that his acts were from one theanadric operation. This evil which inflicted the Church was partly attributable to Pope Honorius I, who’s letters to Sergius, the Patriarch of Constantinople, seemed to have supported the idea that Christ had two natures but one will.  Shortly after the reception of these letters, the Eastern Emperor, Heraclius, upon the composition of the Patriarch, released an edict called the Ecthesis ( εκθεσις , literally “statement of faith”), wherein Christ is taught to have one will. This was also accepted by the Patriarchs of Alexandria, Antioch , and Jerusalem. It is reported that the successor of Honorius, Severinus, had time before his death to reject it. The successor of Severinus…

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