Making Liturgy Normal Again: Three Anecdotes

A dear friend of mine who has been quite the student of liturgical scholarship for years has taken up a task which has long been on his mind but for whatever reason has taken this long to put into writing. The subject has to do with the problems of liturgy and worship in the West. And I do not just mean beginning with the 20th century, but even long before that.

Here is a first part, I’m sure, of more to come. It begins:

“I’d like to share three anecdotes, cutting across ecclesial boundaries, to highlight a serious problem in the Roman Catholic Church I have been reflecting on for a while, before sharing my own reflections and welcoming further input…….”

https://tomsdigest.wordpress.com/2019/01/22/making-liturgy-normal-again-three-anecdotes/

Tom's Digest

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I’d like to share three anecdotes, cutting across ecclesial boundaries, to highlight a serious problem in the Roman Catholic Church I have been reflecting on for a while, before sharing my own reflections and welcoming further input.

“The most powerful memory of my childhood”

bcpI once worked with a lifelong Episcopalian lady who considers herself an orthodox Christian and is doctrinally conservative. One time, water-cooler chatter turned to the Book of Common Prayer and its role in the spiritual life in Anglican Christianity. She shared with me that the single most powerful and consistent memory of her childhood, and one that has kept her anchored in the faith in the face of personal tragedies and loss, is that of her late parents praying Morning and Evening Prayer together every day at set times, including singing and ceremonial appropriate for  one’s domestic church. She said that these times were such that…

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